Friday, April 6, 2012

Making Pomegranate Juice


I have a pomegranate tree.  What a lucky score that was when we bought our house here in Adelaide.  I didn't even know what it was at first.  The poor thing is laden with so much heavy fruit, that much of it is resting on the ground.  Many of the fruit are splitting as well.  Not sure why that is, but I'm sure Google will tell me when I find the time to ask it.

I examined a few of the split ones and decided that as I couldn't see any signs of vermin or insect attack, I would juice them and see how I went.

It's a somewhat time consuming process, but the result is a lovely jewel coloured elixir that I love!


Pomegranate Juice (makes 600ml approx)


5 pomegranates, ripe
handful ice
100 grams water, approximately


1. Place enough water in the sink to cover a pomegranate. Score a pomegranate just through the skin as if to cut it in quarters. Under water (to
prevent juice going everywhere and staining your clothes), use the knife as a wedge to snap each quarter apart. Using gentle pressure with your fingers, prise the seeds out. The seeds will sink, the pith will (mostly) float. Skim the surface to remove as much pith as possible as this can make the juice bitter (as will unripe pomegranates).

2. Place the pomegranate seeds into the TM bowl with the ice and water. 
Blend for 30 seconds on speed 9.
3. Strain the mixture using a sieve, pressing down on the pulp to extract as much juice as possible. The pulp can also be placed into several layers of cheesecloth and squeezed to get as much juice out as possible.
4. To clarify the juice, place a coffee filter inside a strainer and allow the juice to drip through it. This will collect any remaining impurities.

2 comments:

  1. I'm not an expert at all but funnily enough I was just talking to a friend a few days ago about pomegranates. Her mother has a few pomegranate trees and has been juicing them and apparently when they spilt it is an indication of ripeness as it means they are full and bursting with juice.
    The juice does look great! I have never had fresh pomegranate juice over here but overseas just over a year ago I had my first drink of it freshly juiced and it was lovely.

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  2. Thanks for the info about my splitting pomegranates. That does seem to make sense as the split ones were absolutely too full to go back together again! They were definitely the sweetest ones too. Now to find some more split ones and start the process over again :-)

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